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Patio Installations in Wainscott

Wainscott is a little village in Rochester, in Kent. It is in the civil parish of Frindsbury Extra, in the Medway Unitary Authority, that is Medway Council. By 1950 it had been absorbed into the neighbouring residential areas of Strood. Wainscott itself is located quickly next to Frindsbury, and is in the company of beautiful agricultural land, as without difficulty as ancient woodlands. It is speculated that the read out is derived from the OE meaning Wagonner Cot or Wagon Shed.

Tilemaking at Wainscott
A map archaic 1711 shows this hamlet as consisting of a house and a few cottages known as Windscott, the publicize probably referring to a collection of cottages in an exposed or windy place. The house was called ‘White Horse’ and, since the hamlet was situated on a crossroads on the road to the Isle of Grain, it may skillfully have been an inn. By 1838, the proclaim had been corrupted to Wainscott and a local pottery industry was already in existence by 1842. The main works was the Wainscott Pottery owned by a Henry Hone and neighboring this was a smaller operation owned by Thomas Fox. The explanation for their location is easily explained by psychiatry of the local land ownership at this time.
Nearby at Four Elms Hill were two clay pits owned by a William Beadle, who was something of an entrepreneur. Beadle plus owned the home to the quick east of the road in Wainscott and it was here that the potteries were set up. Thus, not by yourself did he sell the clay to the potteries but he with got the rent from their premises as well as the neighboring workers’ cottages. It must have been quite a monopoly for him as competently as inborn rather lucrative. Both potteries produced tiles for the expanding building industry and some may have found their way to London together afterward the local brick trade.
The tithe records also list an Edward Hone (limeburner at Upnor) and a John Hone (brickmaker at Bill Street). It is not known if they were combined to Henry Hone but it is realizable that this was an example of a associates diversifying into everything aspects of supplying the building industry. Henry far along went upon to own the Kings Arms pub and John the Old Oak Inn.
By 1858, there had been a correct of proprietors and the potteries were now owned by Thomas Baker and Jesse Clark Foster. It is likely that the larger premises belonged to the latter since, in 1877, Foster bought the clay pits from the Executors of Beadle who had by then died. With this assumption, Baker must have sold out after a few years to Messrs Charlton & Matthews since, in the book “Industrial Medway” by J.M. Preston, they are mentioned in an announcement dated 1868. This mention is interesting before it shows the diverse range of products monster produced i.e. oven & paving bricks and tiles; pan, plain & ridge tiles; sanitary & land drainage pipes; chimney, flower & paint pots; garden & edging tiles.
In the meantime, Foster continued to evolve his pottery and took his son Theophilus into partnership in 1867. In 1871 they were shown as brick and tile manufacturers but there is no evidence that they had the essential equipment at their clay pits to make bricks on site. Since it was a competitive situation locally, it is more likely that they produced specialised bricks at their premises. In 1882 they sold out to Francis Hazell, who produced bricks, tiles, drainpipes and chimney & garden pots.
The 1862 Ordnance Survey map shows a draw competently next to each of the potteries. Whereas these may unaccompanied be water wells, there is as a consequence the possibility that they were chalk wells. The census of 1871 lists a William Eloine of Wainscott who was described as an ‘excavator’. This is a Strange term before men who dug clay were normally described as merely labourers and it seems to imply heritage at depth. He could of course have been a local without difficulty sinker but, again, the latter term is usually used in census job descriptions. One clue is firm in an article on deneholes written by F.J. Spurrell in 1882, when he mentions a denehole (properly termed a chalkwell) which was after that being used at Plumstead for a tile works. It is known that a small quantity of chalk was further to usual bricks to prevent shrinkage during firing and possibly this was also curtains in the skirmish of tiles. If products of a yellow colour were required, like the Stock Bricks, a greater proportion of chalk would have to be further to gain the colouration. Thus, it is realizable that the local tile works had chalkwells on the premises to gain their own supplies of chalk.

Wainscott is now bypassed to the east by the ‘Wainscott Eastern Bypass’ and to the north by ‘Wainscott Northern Bypass’. These roads, both named the A289, lead traffic from the A2 to the Medway Tunnel. These two roads meet at the ‘Four Elms Roundabout’, where the A228 climbs ‘Four Elms Hill’ and onto the Hoo Peninsula, where the A228 becomes the Ratcliffe Highway, that after that passes the Deangate Ridge Golf Club upon the left and takes the second roundabout exit on the Main Road into Hoo itself. At the summit of Four Elms Hill is the village of Chattenden, that has much MOD land, especially in and vis-а-vis Chattenden Army Barracks. The village has had many homes erected within it on ex-farm/MOD land. These homes were developed by Crest Nicholson and the house is known locally and officially as ‘Liberty Park’. The progress includes many substitute types of familiarization including homes and elderly familiarization for the local residents far along years.

Patio Installations in Wainscott | Award Winners | KMS Contractors

Patio Installations in Wainscott KMS Contractors Ltd, are able to provide a wide range of options when it comes to high quality at an affordable price.

If you’re looking for quality patio installation in Wainscott then you came to the right place. We touched on it before but it is true that anyone with groundwork skills can lay some flags. But to create beautiful garden patio’s in Wainscott that not only have the wow factor but represent your personality takes more than basic skills. Whether it be a modern contemporary patio in Wainscott, or an old fashioned timeless setting, or just a low maintenance perfect area for the whole family the key is listening.

By gathering all your ideas, needs and wishes for you garden we can quickly go to work on a provisional garden design, and incorporate different landscaping ideas with superb and reasonable paving stones and slabs that don’t cost the earth.

We can supply you with lots of great ideas that have proved successful in the past that are capable of being tweaked enabling your garden patio design to be completely unique.

Our job is to get you the most from your budget then apply our trade to make it all come together. We have been involved in everything from small garden design to huge outdoor living area’s and find these are arguably the most enjoyable projects to take due to the dramatic differences created and the hugely positive responses from our customers.

Marshall Awards

Marshalls hold an annual competition where Registered Members are invited to submit examples of their work in a number of categories which are then judged for regional and national awards. Members are also able to list winning projects from other recognised competitions.

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2019/20 Marshalls Regional Award Winner
Best Patio Transformation under 40m

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2018/19 Marshalls Register National Award Winner – Highly Commended
Best use of Always Green

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2018/19 Marshalls Register Regional Award Winner
Best use of Always Green

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2018/19 Marshalls Register Regional Award Winner
Most Creative use of Marshalls Products

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2018/19 Marshalls Register Regional Award Winner
Best Driveway Transformation over 70m

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2017/18 Marshalls Register National Award Winner
Best Permeable Driveway

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2017/18 Marshalls Register Regional Award Winner
Best Permeable Driveway